Musicians die younger than everyone else even if they don’t fall victim to the tragic ’27 club’

musicians
Popular musicians’ lifespans are up to 25 years shorter than the comparable US population. Research by Sydney University also found suicide and homicide rates amongst musicians rose in the 1990s. Professor Dianna Kenny examined 12,665 dead stars from all popular genres between 1950 and 2014. Plane and car crashes killed stars in the 50s and 60s, such as Buddy Holly. A number of popular musicians – including Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain – Amy Winehouse – Janis Joplin have died at the age of 27.

In the past six decades homicide rates were up to eight times greater amongst musicians than the US population. Female musicians tend to die in their early 60s rather than their 80s. Male musicians die in their late 50s compared to non-rockers at 75. She concluded that the ‘pop music “scene” fails to provide boundaries and to model and expect acceptable behaviour’ Read more

Studies of more than 126,000 people have shown that those who regularly attend church are 29 per cent more likely to live longer than non-churchgoers. A University of Texas study found that church attenders live up to seven years longer than non-attenders, and the most regular attenders have the longest life expectancy.

A Duke University study of 2391 people who were at least 65 years old found that regular churchgoers who also prayed daily or studied the Bible daily were 40 per cent less likely to have high blood pressure than those who did not. Elderly churchgoers had better mental health and were less likely to have high degrees of a protein associated with age-related illness. Read more

 

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